NEW: 6-Week Series with Tori Fernandez

Want to up the ante in your yoga practice?

Signup for this 6-week series and you will develop enhanced strength, endurance, flexibility, and mind-body awareness in a fun but challenging vinyasa-based flow. In each class we’ll work on opening and strengthening toward a peak posture and then break it down to make it more accessible. Recommended for those who have a basic understanding of yoga postures and alignment. 

Look for it on the schedule, Move Your Asana, Mondays 6:30PM starting Monday, November 13.

About our teacher
Victoria has been steadily practicing yoga and meditation since early 2014. A believer in Divine intervention, yoga entered her life at a time when everything seemed to crumble and fall apart around her. She suffered with consistent anxiety and bouts of depression from her struggles with years of infertility and infertility treatments. What began as a form of exercise, soon became about the healing and spiritual aspects of the practice quickly drew her in as she began to find a way to calm the anxious mental chatter, and a feeling of connectedness, community, and spirituality that was lacking in her life.

Victoria completed her 200HR Teacher Training at Ebb & Flow under Megan Kearney in 2016 and will complete her 300HR Teacher Training under the guidance of Sheila McVay at John’s Creek Yoga in early 2018. Victoria has a Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy and was a practicing OT for 7 years giving her a deeper understanding of anatomy and body mechanics. She is also a certified Yin Yoga Teacher and designer, creator, and founder of Happy Hearts & Minds for handcrafted meditation malas.

Saltwater Floatation Therapy Coming to Ebb & Flow

We have been expanding our studio, adding two more classrooms (a hot yoga classroom and a quiet room for drop-in meditation) and a spa which will include more bathrooms, showers, massage and private practice space.  The focal point of our spa is our state-of-the-art Saltwater Floatation Therapy pod --the first of it's kind in Gwinnett and Walton Counties.

You may have heard about floatation therapy, floating, or float spas.

It's an effective therapy that has been used by a long list of celebrities, athletes and professional athletic teams. The list includes both 2015 Super Bowl teams, Chicago Cubs, numerous Olympians, athletes Stephen Curry, Tom Brady, Wayne Rooney, Carl Lewis, and celebrities like Elle Macpherson, Peter Gabriel, Michael Crichton, and Susan Sarandon.

All of these people have found pain relief, relaxation, creativity and clarity in a float tank.

We are excited to bring this truly unparalleled experience for relaxation, pain relief, and better sleep quality to the area. Stay tuned for details about our Grand Opening late August 2017!

Photos courtesy of Float Pod Technologies.

 

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Yoga as Medicine?

There is a hefty discussion in the yoga world about yoga as medicine. As accredited teachers through the Yoga Alliance, we are urged to make it clear in our language that yoga is not a prescription, a therapy or a cure. We as teachers are there to facilitate, not to diagnosis or prescribe.

As students, I think we can safely make our own assumptions about what yoga is to us and what it has done for us. And if we are new, we will learn what the practice can do for our body, mind and spirit.

Going forward, our studio is dedicated to bridging the gap with the sciences of medicine, physiology and psychology. We desire to work with health practitioners to create a comprehensive care plan that helps you heal.

As founder and owner of the studio, it is my goal to help you realize the full potential of yoga. Not just as a stretching exercise but as so much more. Our teachers all have hours and hours of study in the science of yoga and we encourage them to keep going.

We will continue to enrich our dedicated staff and arm them with the latest information to help you on your personal journey. We will be working with local health practitioners, building relationships with alternative healers and growing your circle of trust in the local health and wellness community.

Personally, I will be continuing my advanced study with Tiffany Cruikshank and Yoga Medicine, eventually pursuing my 1000 hour training through the program starting in 2017. Though I will keep my Yoga Alliance certification, my goal is to become certified through Yoga Medicine as well. Feel free to take time to read more about this amazing training and it's certifications.

I am dedicated to you, and as teachers, we demonstrate this by advancing our training to be the best that we can be.

With love & gratitude,
Your teacher

Class Schedule Change: New Classes

Starting August 9, Tuesday and Thursdays All Levels will be SPLIT into two different classes. Join us at 8A for All Levels Form, a 60-minute slow paced alignment based yoga including yin postures. Later in the morning, join us for 9:30 All Levels Flow, a 75-minute vinyasa based class with an emphasis on strength and movement.

 

These classes are similar to our existing classes on Saturdays! Please let us know what you think.

New to yoga? Here are some helpful tips for attending your first class…

We have been so fortunate to have so many new yogis join us for class. This is a previously published etiquette list that we thought might those of you who are new and for some who might have forgotten. We'd like to thank Yoga Journal for these do’s and don’ts. We think that it helps foster a stronger community.


Arrive early

Tardiness to yoga class is disruptive and disrespectful to the teacher and other students. To avoid being late, aim to arrive 15 minutes before class is scheduled to start; this gives you time to relax, breathe, and settle in. If you can’t help being a few minutes late, wait outside the class until any opening meditations have ended—barging in and setting up your mat during these times is noisy and bothersome to your fellow students trying to bliss out. We firmly believe that late people are the usually the ones who need yoga the most -- but there is a point where it becomes disruptive to others. We give our students a window. Doors will lock 10 minutes after class begins... please do not knock if you have missed this window. And if you are habitually late, teachers will have to talk with you about a strategy for arriving on time.

Talk to the teacher

If you have any injuries (past or current), concerns or contraindications, talk to the teacher before class. This way, the teacher can recommend variations on certain poses during practice to allow you to reap the benefits without unnecessary strain. Speak up if something doesn’t feel right, but don’t “hog” the teacher during class; if you have lots of concerns, consider scheduling a private session.

Remove your shoes

The studio stays most hygienic if everyone leaves their shoes (yes, even flip-flops) outside the classroom. And pay attention where you’re walking barefoot—it’s a major no-no to tread on other students’ mats.Relish the quiet. A yoga classroom is like a sanctuary—people come here to relax and find peace. Honor this by observing as much quiet as possible: Try not to make distracting sounds (i.e. overzealous grunts and groans). If you want to chat with your neighbor, do so honoring those around you who may not want to chat.

Turn off your cell

Make a habit of doing this before you step foot into the yoga studio; nothing is more grating then the sound of a ringing cell phone during practice. (And few things are as embarrassing as scrambling to silence your phone in the middle of class!) [At Ebb & Flow, we ask that when possible you leave your phone with your other personal belongings at the cubbies at the front of the studios, or better yet, consider leaving it in your car!]

Consider hygiene

Sweat is good—it’s a sign you’re working hard and a healthy way to cleanse the body of toxins. However, if you’re prone to heavy perspiration, bring a towel to class to mop your brow (so you don’t drip on your neighbor’s mat) and wipe up any excess sweat on or around your mat after class.


Skip the scents

Many people have sensitivities to perfumes and scented body lotions; help us keep our studios fragrance-free by avoiding applying any aromatic products before class. If you’re concerned about stink, shower before class and use unscented deodorant.

Keep your belongings outside class
Floor space in a classroom can be limited, so keep your “footprint” small. Limit the belongings near your mat to the bare essentials, going even more minimal during popular classes. : a water bottle, towel, and maybe an additional layer for the relaxation period at the end of class. Leave your coat, purse, keys, cell phone (turned off, of course) duffel bag and whatever else in the designated area outside the classroom.

Wear appropriate clothing
Select clothing based on what type of yoga you’ll be doing, the temperature of the room, and what will be most comfortable for the duration of class. Avoid clothing that is too baggy and loose (which can get in your way during certain poses) as well as clothing that is too tight or revealing—no one wants to witness a “wardrobe malfunction” during class!

Excuse yourself quietly
If you must use the restroom during class, it’s most polite to wait until a short period of rest like child’s pose or between asanas. Excuse yourself quietly, trying not to obstruct other students’ view of the teacher.

Stay ‘til the end
Savasana is a delicious period of relaxation at the end of each yoga class. If you roll up your mat and dash out the door during this quiet time, you’re not only annoying your fellow students, you’re missing out on what is arguably the most essential part of the practice. Forget about the to-do list that awaits you after class, and allow yourself to really sink in to this incredibly restoring pose. Breathe and remind yourself this is why you’re here. You’ll be glad you did!

Clean-up Your Space
Be sure to put any props away where you found them and if you use one of our yoga mats, we ask that you use the cleaner to wipe it down before you hang it back up.